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Cody Colston
01-07-2004, 02:27 PM
Before I left for work yesterday, I mounted a 9" x 5" blank of Bodark and proceeded to rough turn a bowl.

This is only my 2nd turned bowl, so I started experimenting with the different weapons I had available; bowl gouge, roughing gouge, round-nose scraper. Of them all, the Sorby bowl gouge gave me the best results and fewest catches so I stuck with it.

Some of the things I noticed were:

1. When turning the outside, the chips were small...even like sawdust at times. I was taking a rather light approach due to the propensity of the gouge to catch.

2. Using an overhand grip on the gouge, the chips ejecting through the flute were really doing a number on the edge of my left hand. Does anyone wear a fingerless glove when turning? Is that a bad idea?

3. Prior to reverse mounting the blank, I drilled a 2" hole in the center with a forstner bit. This really made turning the inside easier, as I didn't have much to remove near the center. I had trouble on my first bowl getting that part turned away.

4. When turning the inside, I was able to generate long curls of wood with the Sorby gouge. Really fun, but why was the inside easier to turn.

5. Trying to hand sand the tool marks on the outside proved to be a slow process, even after lightly scraping the bowl to remove the gouge grooves I left. Even using 60 grit, the green Bodark didn't sand off very well. Is power sanding the answer or do I have to leave a smoother finish with the gouge?

I'll post a picture of the bowl after I finish it this weekend...if I don't blow it up trying to get it to an acceptable wall thickness.

Cody


The expert at anything was once a beginner...

Dave Daniel
01-07-2004, 02:57 PM
I always turn with fingerless gloves - a pair of weight lifting gloves. It protects my hand from the hot shavings coming up the flute as well as saving the skin from an incidental brush against a sharp bowl edge.

WoodMangler
01-07-2004, 03:53 PM
"Of them all, the Sorby bowl gouge gave me the best results and fewest catches so I stuck with it."

Aha! :)

"1. When turning the outside, the chips were small...even like sawdust at times. I was taking a rather light approach due to the propensity of the gouge to catch."

You get more leverage on the inside of the bowl due to the angle and pivot point, plus the angle that the wood is hitting the cutting edge of the gouge is "better" or steeper.... so it's easier to get curls instead of dust... Once you get a little more comfortable, you can apply more pressure and present a more aggressive angle of the gouge and you'll get long shavings on the outside...

"2. Using an overhand grip on the gouge, the chips ejecting through the flute were really doing a number on the edge of my left hand. Does anyone wear a fingerless glove when turning? Is that a bad idea?"

A real turner wouldn't need gloves! (just checking Daves sense of humor :) )
I don't wear gloves, but those chips are really hot... I usually just sharpen the gouge again and the chips cool off a little...

"3. Prior to reverse mounting the blank, I drilled a 2" hole in the center with a forstner bit. This really made turning the inside easier, as I didn't have much to remove near the center. I had trouble on my first bowl getting that part turned away."

There's a cutting technique that I'd like to see ya try out...
You cut from the center of the bowl to just before where the bottom transitions to the sides, and use a pivoting motion, gouge starting at 90 degrees to the bottom of the bowl (pointing right at the center eh) and use the contact spot where the gouge meets the rest as the pivot point, and the gouge flutes facing left at about 45 degrees... make a short sweeping motion and hollow out just the bottom... do this 3 or 4 times... then switch back to a regular cut from the rim to the (now) hollow part of the bottom until there's a smooth transition from rim to center/bottom. This cut is quicker, and avoids that awkward motion where the gouge must transition from the sides to the bottom...

"Trying to hand sand the tool marks on the outside proved to be a slow process, even after lightly scraping the bowl to remove the gouge grooves I left. Even using 60 grit, the green Bodark didn't sand off very well. Is power sanding the answer or do I have to leave a smoother finish with the gouge?"

There's a transition from a roughing cut to a finishing cut to a shear scraping cut that I learned from the Ellsworth video that totally eliminates most of this, and is also how I refine the final shape, remove any gouges, and leave a finish that can be sanded just to start the smoothing, not to remove any gouges... I could try to explain it... I think... maybe :)... it'd be better to see it yourself...

Hope this helps....

Cody Colston
01-07-2004, 06:10 PM
Thanks Marc,

I think I need to get the Ellsworth video. Even though I'm able to get a passable result, I know my technique could use lots of refinement. Seeing how it is done has to be more beneficial than just reading and looking at still pictures.

Cody


The expert at anything was once a beginner...

dicklaxt
01-07-2004, 06:15 PM
Thats exactly right at least on my part........I've got to see it or experience it first hand . I have three videos I'll gladly mail to you if you want ....just send me the address and you can send them back after you have absorbed the info....


dick

jpaice
01-08-2004, 07:16 PM
I use light gardening gloves to protect the left hand. I have had a few cuts and found the gloves help alot...

I also found that using a DA sander on the outside of the bowl works great and cuts sanding time in half. I like the idea of power sanding..just seems easier to me...I need to find a power sander for the insides of the bowl to make that sanding task easier too...:)