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  1. #1
    wayne86
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    Wood working gloves

    I to often will get a splinter when, for example, putting pressure ona a board against a router table while pushing with the other hand. Are there gloves meant for wood working to help prevent that? Id like to have something I could wear the entire time so they would have to be supple enought to hold a pencil and write and hold a small steel rulter so the thick leather construction gloves wont work for that.
    Ive seen on TV people that use knives to carve have some kind of glove to protect themselves from cuts. any thoughts?

    thanks

  2. #2
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    Nath Saburbin Bahstin, Massachusetts, USA.
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    RE: Wood working gloves

    I wear gloves when working with rough stock at the jointer and planer, but not otherwise.

    The 'armored' carving gloves would not be good for full-time use IMHO. They would not do much for 'stabbing' that you'd get from larger splinters.

    If you feel the need, something to look into are mechanics gloves, sold at auto parts stores . . . they fit snug enough to not get 'caught' someplace they shouldn't, and they are not terribly expensive, yet they are sturdy and comfortable.

  3. #3
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    RE: Wood working gloves

    I wouldn't advise wearing gloves while operating any powered woodworking tools. Even with close-fitting gloves you can still get them caught and have your hand pulled into a blade/cutter. I'd say just cowboy up and deal with the occassional splinter. :)

    But, if you must wear gloves, [link:www.nationalsafetyinc.com/product.asp?Product_Id=168277&d_id=9435&l1=9325&l2 =9435|these] are close fitting, have a rubberized palm for a good grip and will still allow you to do fairly intricate tasks. I got a pair at the rig and carried them home. They are great for outdoor work and I hardly know I have them on after a while.

    Cody
    Tyler, TX


    I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just...Thomas Jefferson



  4. #4
    Member
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    Sep 2004
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    Sacramento, CA, USA.
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    RE: Wood working gloves

    I'm with Cody on this one. No gloves for machinery work. I'll use gloves when i'm hauling things in and out of the shop, but that's really about it.

    To solve the OP's issue, I'd say it's a perfect application for a feather board and maybe a couple push shoes/blocks. It feels unnatural at first, but it doesn't take all that long to get used to sending a chunk of wood/plastic/foam to do the risky work instead.

  5. #5
    wayne86
    Guest

    RE: Wood working gloves

    yes. I use feather boards top and bottom and push sticks. The logic for not wearing tight fitting gloves is misguided, its infinitely more likely a t-shirt, sleeves, pants, belt tip, hat or hair would get caught in machinery. I admire you both for doing your work in the nude and sorry bout the chrome dome.

    found what I needed at Home Depot.

    Thanks DW for the input.

  6. #6
    Member
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    RE: Wood working gloves

    I guess it's just me, then. I've seen FAR more injuries involving a glove than I have involving hair or clothing. While yes, loose clothing is dangerous, I think gloves are riskier since they're usually attached to the thing that is closest to the dangerous cutting implement.

  7. #7
    wayne86
    Guest

    RE: Wood working gloves

    >I wear gloves when working with rough stock at the jointer
    >and planer, but not otherwise.
    >
    >The 'armored' carving gloves would not be good for full-time
    >use IMHO. They would not do much for 'stabbing' that you'd
    >get from larger splinters.
    >
    >If you feel the need, something to look into are mechanics
    >gloves, sold at auto parts stores . . . they fit snug enough
    >to not get 'caught' someplace they shouldn't, and they are
    >not terribly expensive, yet they are sturdy and comfortable.

    Its the tiny needle like splinters the dig in and I have to knife into skin to get at with tweezers that are my nemesis. I also occasionally will get a cut when sliding a wood edge across my fingers...usually 4/4 red oak. There was a recent knuckle scrape from the slip of a woodworkers rasp that got me thinking about gloves. As I type I have 2 cuts, 1 splinter and the scrape on my left hand. These tend to eliminate or reduce my guitar playing which is the biggest motivation for gloves.


  8. #8
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    Ephrata, Pa, USA.
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    RE: Wood working gloves

    I agree.
    There was a guy on site that was using a hammer drill. Not the lil one but the bigger hilti type. While changin bits, he musta hit the power and the bit caught his glove. After it was all said and done he had a glove with a pencil sized hole in it. And his middle finger Too. Power tools and gloves don't mix.

    wm

  9. #9
    Member
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    Jun 2004
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    Albuquerque, New Mexico.
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    RE: Wood working gloves

    How about batting gloves Wayne? They fit pretty tightly.

    http://www.ballgloves.com/cgi-local/p.pl?BG51GPS

  10. #10
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    RE: Wood working gloves

    I wear a pair of these in the shop (search 145L on hd website), except some fine operations where you need the dexterity. Note that they will not help if you hit your finger instead of the backer with a brad nailer, ouch.



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