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  1. #1
    Mike (Guest)
    Guest

    Danish Oil vs. Teak Oil

    Hi,
    What exactly is the difference between these two oil finishes?

    How would they stand up to being handled a lot?

    Would they tint wood?

    thanks,
    Mike

  2. #2
    Member
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    RE: Danish Oil vs. Teak Oil

    Danish oil is a very generic term. It can mean almost anything.

    Teak oil is a kind of polyermzing oil that changes to form a protective finish. It will build up on the surface a bit but for the most part it penitrates into the wood and reacts to it.

    Most Danish oils are a combination of oil, thinner and varnish. Some have heavy metal dryers and colors added to them.

    The main comercial brand is Watco and I have used it a lot over the years.

    This type of oil finish (you can make your own and that may be better) builds up and has some of the advantages of the varnish.

    A good formual is 1/3 non poly oil based varnish 1/3 boiled lindseed oil or teak oil, and 1/3 naptha. You can add some stain or japan color to this mix for the first coat.

    Apply with brush or rag and let it stay on the surface for 10 to 15 min's try to keep it wet durring this time. It is possible to wet sand durring this time as that helps to fill grain. After the 10 to 15 min wipe off the excess. Recoat with just the clear in about 24 hours. Up to 4 or 5 coats will build up a surface level and give a nice finish to the piece.

    Lou

  3. #3
    Mike (Guest)
    Guest

    RE: Danish Oil vs. Teak Oil

    thanks Lou,

    My local supply has the Watco Danish oil in colors.
    My piece is several woods Ash, Quilt Maple, regular Maple, and Ebony.

    I'm worried about a darker (reddish) tint on the quilt maple. Will it kill the figure?

    How about the ebony? (though I don't see getting much blacker than black).

    Should I seal the wood under the oil first?

    thanks,
    Mike


  4. #4
    Member
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    RE: Danish Oil vs. Teak Oil

    First with all those wood types I would go with natural oil only no color. Don't seal the wood. Oils work by penitration into the wood. They combine with the oxigen in the air and the wood to form a hard (realativly) finish.

    Nothing will effect the color of the ebony. The quilted maple with jump off the surface with oil you will be amazed with the grain you see. The others will look deeper and richer. Try some on a scrap and judge for yourself.

    Lou

  5. #5
    JMC (Guest)
    Guest

    RE: Danish Oil vs. Teak Oil

    It's hard to dispute anything Lou says, but I must enter my 2 cents worth. I found a recipe for using Watco Oil on a forum a while back and it works wonders. Basically it is as follows:

    1) apply coat #1 and keep wet for 1 hour. At the end of this time wipe off excess and continue to check for any oozing for the next several hours. (best to do this on a weekend). Allow this to dry for 48 hours. (Very Important)

    2) apply coat #2 and keep wet for 20 minutes. Follow same procedure above. Allow to dry 48 hours. (Very Important)

    3) apply coat #3 and wet sand with 360 grit. Spend some time on the ends of the pieces (end grain) and you will be amazed at the result. Wipe down after wet sanding and follow procedure above. Allow to dry 48 hours. (Very Important)

    4) apply a coat of Watco Wax and wet sand with 1500 grit. Wipe and let dry. By this time, you will have the feel of a baby's but. Unbelievable. If you don't, you skipped a step or short changed it somewhere.

    Keep in mind, that an oil finish can not be accomplished quickly but it is well worth it. You will see and feel wood like you never have before. You can wet sand during step #2 if you wish, but the sanding produces better results the more that the wood has sealed.

    Good Luck.

  6. #6
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    RE: Danish Oil vs. Teak Oil

    Do you ever burnish after the oil steps and before the oil.

    It is alot of Labor but it gives it an extra shine. I vigorously rub the piece as the last coat dries. I use #0000 steel wool spread out under a push block so that I can get some force behind it. After the steel wool I blow off and dust of remains of the wool and do the same with a fine cotton cloth. I do it enough to create real heat in the wood. somehow the heat must help the oil cure but after a minute stand back and watch the shine.

    I tried this in between coats and found that the oil did not penetrate as well after burnishing.


    Chris.


  7. #7
    JMC (Guest)
    Guest

    RE: Danish Oil vs. Teak Oil

    Yes. I have found that if I put a pad of really fine steel wool under my random orbit sander, that this will produce a really high sheen when looking at it from an angle and is extremely smooth and wonderful to rub your hands over. I know this sounds kind of crazy and my wife thinks I'm nuts when I'm sitting in the rocker glider I made for her and rub my hands up and down the arms. Only someone who has taken the time to do a truly good oil finish can appreciate. I hope I'm not alone on this one. Anyway, I figure if I spend the time to get it there, whether anybody other than me appreciates it or not is irelevant.

  8. #8
    Randy L. Atkinson aka RainShadow (Guest)
    Guest

    RE: Danish Oil vs. Teak Oil

    MIKE: How about this for a finish ---- Tung Oil, Boiled Linseed Oil and Satin PolyU (1/3 each).
    It is also Sam Maloof's receipe at Rockler.

    Good luck and be safe, Randy

  9. #9
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    RE: Danish Oil vs. Teak Oil

    The first piece that I used this technique on was a solid walnut side table that I built with hand tools. I liked it so much that I decided to keep it for myself. Which ment I had to make something else in place of it. It was supposed to be a wedding present. I put it in my living room and just sit there and feel the top. It is allmost erotic. J/K?

    This little extra sheen it well worth the time. Besides it is great for your tris and pecks.


    Chris.P.S. try the cloth after you blow off the dust. Lil something extra extra extra.


  10. #10
    Hi everyone. I have just got some doors made from Burma teak ... With superb grains mostly in the central panels. I was wanting to finish with watco teak oil or Danish oil. Have both in stock... Was looking for a guide in how to do this ...and which one would be better... All the doors are inside the house ...thank you !

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