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Thread: How to stack lumber

  1. #1
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    How to stack lumber

    I just purchased a load of hard maple and red oak and was wondering if there is a correct way to stack the lumber. The lumber is S2S from Paxton. Thanks for your time.

  2. #2
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    Yes......

    Ripper, there is a correct way to sticker your lumber. Are we to assume that it has already been seasoned? Do you want to sticker outside or indoors? Has it already been delivered? Have you read the posting on "Tips for Outdoor storage" a few lines below?

    Dano

  3. #3
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    RE: How to stack lumber

    I believe the best way to stack this material is at my house. I have a real nice spot all picked out and ready for the delivery....
    Take I-75 North to exit #....

    I love getting a new delivery of wood....all that possibility and promise. Good luck in your efforts there!

    TWS

  4. #4
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    RE: How to stack lumber

    Yes,the lumber has already been seasoned and is ready to go.Basically I was wanting to know if it mattered which way the grain was facing when stacked or if this should be a worry.

  5. #5
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    RE: How to stack lumber

    Ripper,

    Basically you sticker the boards on the flat with 3/4" x 3/4" Birch or Maple stickers between each board on about 16" centers. This will allow the air to circulate through the bunk. Even air circulation is important, so if this lumber is to be stored inside, recommended, it should be stickered accordingly.

    If it is to be stickered outdoors, a foundation should be built using concrete blocks and Birch or Maple 4xs to support the bunk. They should be at least 12" off the ground, at least 16" OC, and on a flat plane. You want them off the ground so that the bottom boards don't absorb ground moisture, the use of Birch or Maple prevents staining. The bunk should be covered with a sheet of ply on top with a tarp over that. Use concrete blocks to weight down the ply and tarp, peg the skirt of the tarp like you would a tent.

    The bunk should be orientated in a fairly protected spot on your property protected from the prevailing wind while providing good air circulation and out of direct sunlight. Depending on the length of time before use, the boards should be rotated from top to bottom. Not knowing your climate painting the ends with an oil base paint or coating them with parrifin might be a good idea, this will help prevent the ends from splitting. The ends should already be protected though.

    That's the basics, hope this helps.

    Dano

  6. #6
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    RE: How to stack lumber

    Maybe I am missing something, but why not use 3/4" plywood strips for the stickers? I always see hardwoods recomended, but plywood would seem easier to make sure they are the same thickness and cheaper.

    Best Regards,

    Bill

    "If it is worth doing, it is worth overdoing"

  7. #7
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    RE: How to stack lumber

    Bill,

    My little "primer" was in general and very basic terms. The two main reasons for using hardwood such as Birch or Maple as stickers are to eliminate staining from the stickers and compression of the stickers. Not knowing how many board feet is to be stickered and where, I didn't want to make assumptions. Making consistant dimensioned stickers is not difficult at all, especially when done on the TS.

    FWIW, I just ordered 60 bd. ft. of quarter sawn 6/4 KD White Oak, even though it amounts to about 9 boards, they will still be carefully stickered in my shop when delivered. Since this material is to be used for a door, straightness, abscence of warp, twist, and cupping is especially important.

    I suppose that use of ply or MDF as stickers for seasoned wood to be stored inside would not be a "biggie", I just happen to have a shelf full of Birch and Maple stickers.

    Dano

  8. #8
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    RE: How to stack lumber

    Thanks for the clarification. It was more of a question to see if their was a problem with the plywood/sheet goods than a criticism of using hardwood stickers.

    Best Regards,

    Bill

    "If it is worth doing, it is worth overdoing"

  9. #9
    Sonny Edmonds
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    RE: How to stack lumber

    I've also been told it is best to use the same type of wood for the stickers. So I do that with mine.
    I'm curious about the 3/4" thickness. When I have seen riks readied for kiln drying they typically have been using what appeared to be 1/4" x 1 1/2" stickering.
    I suppose that's to get maximum kiln useage. But why not use simular for your home stack? Air will still circulate.
    That's what I have done with my loads, but often my wood isn't around very long before it turns into something.

    That's something on my mind for the shop expansion the LOML brought up yet again the other day. A good storage area on the South wall to keep wood warm and dry. Possibly even a solar kiln back there.


    Sonny Edmonds
    "Precision Firewood Specialist"
    http://home.earthlink.net/~sonnypie/
    God Bless America !

  10. #10
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    Well.........

    Sonny,

    My take is that most kilns that I've seen not only have forced air circulation but, humidity control as well. Like you allude to, kiln operators want to maximize the use of the kiln. IMHO, 1/4" thick stickers just isn't enough to give proper air circulation, especially if one is going to air dry or sticker the stock outdoors.

    Like you, stock doesn't hang around my shop for very long but, when it is delivered I sticker it to let it acclimate to the shop. Habit I guess. FWIW.

    Dano

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