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  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Oak Harbor, WA, USA.
    Posts
    72

    Wind Chimes (type of string)

    I have some wind chimes that I am restoring. The wooded parts are rotted and need to be replaced, however, the chimes portion are still good. I have a few questions. I don't know what type of line (or string) to use, any thoughts? Also, I'm going to use ebony for the wood. I've never used ebony before so I'm not sure what type protectant I should apply. Thoughts?

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Florida.
    Posts
    52

    RE: Wind Chimes (type of string)

    I don't consider myself a wood-chime engineer, but heck, it ain't brainsurgery either. I use mostly 30 lb. monofilament. Its pretty strong, holds up well, and limber enough to tie knots. I've also used nylon twine, the tightly braided kind. I've even got one out back made up with EMT, J-box cover plates, monel leader wire and fish swivels. Hummmmmm, maybe next I'll try basket-weaving or ....flower arranging would be nice. Have fun.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Cloverdale, CA, USA.
    Posts
    653

    RE: Wind Chimes (type of string)

    I've used fly line (wooven) for our windchimes (color to match look of chimes). Not the slightest sign of rotting or getting brittle----it will wear against sharp edges which is the only breakage I've had.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Iowa CIty, Iowa, usa.
    Posts
    1,989

    RE: Wind Chimes (type of string)

    does monofiliment degrade in sunlight? I don't know why but I was thinking it did. Then again, it has been a LOOOOOONG time since I went a fishin'
    brent

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Cloverdale, CA, USA.
    Posts
    653

    RE: Wind Chimes (type of string)

    Don't know if it's sunlight or just age, but monofiliment does degrade---but the stuff I use is some very old stuff my wife's ex- even left when he moved out----this stuff is at least 20 years old and still works well----similar to line sometimes used on bait casting reels.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Orchard Park, New York, USA.
    Posts
    2,866

    RE: Wind Chimes (type of string)

    It degrades in sunlight is the problem with it...

    Left on the reel and it'll last almost indefinately...
    I'd use some braided fighing line if you want super thin cord, or use the fly line as someone else suggested for more of a twine look.

    Then cast the chimes with a good 6.6 multi use rod into the wind and thumb the spool just a tad before it hits the surface to prevent backlash...

    I...I'll have a sit down shall I.

    Rob.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Oak Harbor, WA, USA.
    Posts
    72

    RE: Wind Chimes (type of string)

    Thanks for the inputs... I hadn't thought of fishing line, fly or otherwise. I think I'll get some nice looking fly line and it should work great!

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by edandq View Post
    I have some wind chimes that I am restoring. The wooded parts are rotted and need to be replaced, however, the chimes portion are still good. I have a few questions. I don't know what type of line (or string) to use, any thoughts? Also, I'm going to use ebony for the wood. I've never used ebony before so I'm not sure what type protectant I should apply. Thoughts?
    Ok, if you are interested in crafting then I suggest you to look into silverware wind chimes. The most important thing is that you can use any kind of silverware you may have lying around the house. The real silver will give you the best tone, even the newer stainless steel will have a sound quality that you will love to hear. I think silverware is the best idea to protect your wind chimes.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    australia
    Posts
    2
    If you are interested in crafting but aren't quite sure where you want to start, maybe you should look into silverware wind chimes. These wind chimes are simple to make and they will keep you entertained for hours once you have them finished. When you start gathering your material, be sure that you get a lightweight plastic string to hang your silverware with. By using this kind of string, you are guaranteed to have your handmade wind chimes last for a very long time.

  10. #10
    Wind chimes can add a pleasant touch to an outdoor area. The gentle music that produce when the wind hits them just right is very melodic. Wind chimes produced the sound is based on the wind chimes design and the type of material that are used to makes up the chimes.If you have any idea, please share. Thanks

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