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  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Wilcox, PA.
    Posts
    16

    Staining Curly Maple

    Hello all,


    My name is Brad im new to this site and just wanted to introduce myself, I currently am working on a curly maple jewelry box and i wondered if anyone knew the best method for staining curly maple.

    Im considering boiled linseed oil followed by a Deft semigloss lacquer.

    Thanks guys,
    Brad

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Maine, USA.
    Posts
    6,010

    RE: Staining Curly Maple

    Welcome to the forum, Brad!

    That sounds like a fine plan to me, though technically nothing that you're planning is "staining". :)

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Minnesota.
    Posts
    4,589

    RE: Staining Curly Maple

    Welcome to the forum Brad!

    Nothing at all wrong with what you plan on doing. Make sure you wait until that BLO dries though. Maybe a week or so. When the smell goes away.

    I'm a big fan of Shellac myelf. It is easy to learn to apply, and you can fix mistakes in it real easy. I also like what it does to the wood. It leaves a nice warm look. It can also be rubbed out to a real high gloss.
    Keystone

    One of the Original Charter Members. Circa 2000

    No longer here. Can now be found at WoW.




  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Bradford, Vermont, MerryCanna.
    Posts
    18,751

    RE: Staining Curly Maple

    Welcome, Brad!

    Ohhhh, you're gonna' LOVE what that oil does when it hits the maple... do sand it up to a really high grit before you oil it; you'll never regret having done that.

    When I do that, I can feel a lump in my throat - every time.

    -- Tim --



    Wood eye
    or
    Wooden eye?
    :)


  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Wayne, Pa..
    Posts
    383

    RE: Staining Curly Maple

    Brad,

    Many people use curly maple but try for different results in the staining. A few hundred years ago curly or tiger maple was the preferred wood for kentucky rifles and it would be stained medium to dark brown with the stripe very dark. Some people like a light color with the stripe showing, but not screaming.

    The method I have learned to use is the first, and is worthy of some experimentation. After final sanding to 180# the wood receives a dye, I've used water and alcohol based. The colors I've used and seen used vary from medium yellows or amber yellows to browns - as I said, experiment. If you have used alcohol based the next step is to bathe the piece in hot water to open the grain up to receive stain. The stain is usually applied with a Scotch abrasive pad so that the grain can be sanded at the same time. The combination I was most familiar with was amber yellow aniline dye, alcohol based, water, then brown oil based stain. By varying the dye, the level of the brown in the stain, or tinted the stain, you can develope a good variety of colors.

    Amber shellac was applied over this, bringing more color to the piece. Check out www.furnituremakers.com to see examples of this coloring process, That is where I learned it.

    John
    John


    Did you ever think that maybe the crumb just wanted to steal our wirecutters?

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