Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    .
    Posts
    24

    Staining Hickory

    I am just about to start my largest project, all new kitchen cabinets, carcasses and faces. Wood choice is hickory in the mission style. I am trying to get the color to my wifes liking, and that might be imposible. I tried a sample with pure tung oil and like the way it brings out the grain but it needs to be a more honey colored. What can I add to the tung oil to do this? Also can a lacqure be applied over the tung oil?
    My wife also likes the detail of the 1/2" square of darker wood in the corner of the doors. What would be the easiest way to do this? Would a hollow chisel mortiser do this in hickory? Thanks in advance, Mark.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Maine, USA.
    Posts
    6,010

    RE: Staining Hickory

    >I am just about to start my largest project, all new kitchen
    >cabinets, carcasses and faces. Wood choice is hickory in the
    >mission style. I am trying to get the color to my wifes
    >liking, and that might be imposible. I tried a sample with
    >pure tung oil and like the way it brings out the grain but
    >it needs to be a more honey colored. What can I add to the
    >tung oil to do this? Also can a lacqure be applied over the
    >tung oil?

    Have you tried pure boiled linseed oil? It makes for a slightly darker color than pure tung oil. If that works for you, it would avoid the many problems that can sometimes accompany a staining/dying process.


    >My wife also likes the detail of the 1/2" square of darker
    >wood in the corner of the doors. What would be the easiest
    >way to do this? Would a hollow chisel mortiser do this in
    >hickory? Thanks in advance, Mark.

    Just as a "surface" detail? I did this for a mirror in our dining room. I just laid out the square and cut it by hand with a chisel. If you have a hollow chisel mortiser, that would work but isn't necessary if you have a couple of sharp chisels of the right size, IMHO.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Gaylord, Michigan.
    Posts
    4,974

    RE: Staining Hickory

    Mark,

    Is the Hickory you have heartwood, sapwood, or both?

    Reason I ask is because the sapwood of Hickory is darn near white and the heartwood is a light brown or light redish brown. Stains, tung oil, boiled linseed oil, and what not will have different effects on different tones...

    As a rule, your lighter toned woods will amber or yellow with age, I've found in a lot of cases, where an "aged" look is desired, staining with Min Wax Wood Finish "Golden Oak" (#210B) will yeild excellent results, usually when ragged on as opposed to brushing it on. I've found it much easier to control the actual color when I'm "tinting" using a rag.

    Boiled linseed oil is more amber than pure tung oil, regardless of which you use, make darn sure it's dry before you shoot the lacquer.

    As to the "square detail" that you refer; I'm assuming that this would be the square pegs that Greene & Greene and the Roycrofters used for their mortise/tenon joints. There are a couple of approaches to take, one being the hollow chisel to bore the square hole for the pegs. The square pegs are slightly tapered and left proud so that the tops are faceted with a paring chisel (in the form of a pyramid). The other approach would be the one used by Green & Green and the Roycrofters. They bored the holes with a drill bit, made the square pegs a tad over size and rapped them in with a mallet, and faceted the tops as mentioned above. Hickory does have the propensity to split, so I'd recommend using a softer wood if you go the "authentic" route. FWIW.

    Dano

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    .
    Posts
    24

    RE: Staining Hickory

    Dano, The wood I have must be sap wood as it is nearly white. I prefer the white mixed with the brown. I will try the minwax golden oak you suggested. My wife is insistant on the square peg in each corner, so hopefully my delta hollow chisel mortiser will cut the hickory. For what ever reason I had some difficulty with the 1/2" mortise chisel in vertical grain dug fir. It took quite a bit if lever pressure to cut and the bit and chisel go hot.
    Thanks Dano and Rob for your suggestions, Mark

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Moscow, ID, USA.
    Posts
    289

    RE: Staining Hickory

    For the "amber" color you want what about trying a Dark Garnet Shellac.

    Also for the mortiser try extending the drill bit a little more so the bit cleans the mortise out more before the chisle squares it up.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Gaylord, Michigan.
    Posts
    4,974

    RE: Staining Hickory

    Mark,

    The chisels that come with the Delta mortising attatchment are crap, first thing I did was get a good set when I got mine...The other thing is that when you set up, make sure your RPMs aren't too high and that you make your first cut in a few "plunges", if you don't back the chisel out it has a hard time ejecting the chips....

    Any who, good luck.

    Dano

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    .
    Posts
    24

    RE: Staining Hickory

    sirkt,
    Thanks for the suggestion about the bit / chisel adjustment. I lowered the bit 1/16" and it made all the difference.

    Dano,
    I sharpened the "P.O.S." Delta chisel and that helped.
    Where do I get quality bits and chisel set for the Delta mortiser?

    I just purchased the Minwax golden oak stain haven't tried it as yet.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Gaylord, Michigan.
    Posts
    4,974

    RE: Staining Hickory

    Mark,

    I got my set through Garret-Wade. This was a number of years back; dunno if they still carry them....But, the shank diameter is a "standard" so it shouldn't be too hard to find a good set.

    Dano

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •