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  1. #1
    Member
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    May 2006
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    lutz.
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    2

    How do I make perfect 45 degree angle cuts?

    I am making frames and am cutting 45 degree angels to join together to make the frame. The problem I am having is that when put these peices together I have a small crack in two of the joints which I cant seem to get perfect. Please help

  2. #2
    Member
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    Mar 2006
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    Poland.
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    RE: How do I make perfect 45 degree angle cuts?

    Welcome to the forum Eric

    Please go to this post, maybe it will help you.
    http://www.woodworking.com/dcforum/DCForumID4/3744.html

    niki


  3. #3
    Member
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    Dec 1969
    Location
    Bradford, Vermont, MerryCanna.
    Posts
    18,751

    RE: How do I make perfect 45 degree angle cuts?

    Nissim, you really ARE settling in here well! :)

    Eric, welcome to the forum!

    Those miters really are hard to get exactly on the nubbins. Even if nothing else, sometimes blade flex can give you a slightly less-than-perfect cut... especially in the harder woods.

    Some people build a "shooting board" and handplane their miters that last nth until they fit exactly. Other folks buy a miter trimmer, a large shear that trims with high precision. Some even make the miter, then cut through it (resulting in a perfectly balanced 0.125"-wide kerf through the miter) and insert a 1/8"-thick strip of contrasting wood... or even an applique.

    Picture frames aren't anything terribly easy or uninvolved to get just so. They LOOK so simple... yet the angles are highly critical.

    -- Tim --


    Crow ain't so bad
    Once you get the hang of
    the recipe


    :)

  4. #4
    Member
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    Dec 2005
    Location
    graham, wa, usa.
    Posts
    179

    RE: How do I make perfect 45 degree angle cuts?

    Obviously getting the 45's right is important but one thing I overlooked for awhile is that two opposing sides, like top/bottom or left/right must be EXACTALY the same length. If they're not you wont get good miters even if your 45's are perfect.

  5. #5
    Member
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    May 2006
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    .
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    RE: How do I make perfect 45 degree angle cuts?

    After making your mitered cuts, mark, on one of your boards, what needs to be trimmed in order for them to fit properly. Wrap an 80 grit belt, for a belt sander, on a 2X4 (about 10 1/2" long for a 4X24 belt) and hand sand the edge to fit. A few good strokes does the trick. 50 or 80 grit for end grain sanding.

    This size block sander, also, comes in handy for a number of other "touch-ups" and for knocking off corners and edges, quickly, where not wanted.

    Sonny

  6. #6
    Member
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    Mar 2006
    Location
    Poland.
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    340

    RE: How do I make perfect 45 degree angle cuts?

    >Nissim, you really ARE settling in here well! :)

    When the teacher is good…..

    Thank you Tim

    niki



  7. #7
    Sonny Edmonds
    Guest

    RE: How do I make perfect 45 degree angle cuts?

    Perfect....
    Therein lies the rub.
    You cannot attain "perfect". Nor can you get "exact" either.
    How CLOSE you can come, and learning to repeat it are the tricks.
    But nothing is perfect.
    So they made glue to fill in the difference. :P

    :D

    [link:home.att.net/~paul.edmonds/|Sonny Edmonds ]
    "Precision Firewood Specialist"
    God Bless America !
    One Nation Under God!
    "Lurkimus turdius orifus"

    [h1]Welcome to the Forum![/h1]





  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Cedar Park, TX, US of A.
    Posts
    16,681

    RE: How do I make perfect 45 degree angle cuts?

    The first trick is finding an accurate method/device for setting either the bevel angle of the blade or the angle of the mitering device. I've found that halfway decent drafting triangles seem quite accurate as well as those aluminum "Speed Squares", the 45 degree triangle ones.

    A good bet is to make a sled to use on the table saw, which has permanently mounted fences set at 45 degrees to the blade and 90 degrees to each other. Some method of setting up a stop block to get that exact (or near exact) length of opposing pieces is a great idea, so the sled thing works up to a certain length, but becomes quite bulky if you need 4 or 5 foot fences for your stop blocks.

    An extended fence attached to your miter gage gives you added accuracy and also allows for the stop block but again can get bulky for large frames.

    Adding sandpaper to your fences to help keep the workpiece from sliding along the fence, which it is more apt to do when working at an angle to the blade, is also helpfull, as is working with a sharp and clean blade of the proper configuration. Getting your stock straight as an arrow before trying to cut your miters will go a long way toward success, also.

    And, when all else fails, get you some hefty band clamps and force the issue, glueing all four corners simultaneously.

  9. #9
    Sonny Edmonds
    Guest

    RE: How do I make perfect 45 degree angle cuts?

    I knew Hefty makes trash bags,
    But they make clamps, too?
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    }> :7

    :D

    [link:home.att.net/~paul.edmonds/|Sonny Edmonds ]
    "Precision Firewood Specialist"
    God Bless America !
    One Nation Under God!
    "Lurkimus turdius orifus"

    [h1]Welcome to the Forum![/h1]





  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Louisville, KY, USA.
    Posts
    556

    RE: How do I make perfect 45 degree angle cuts?

    The only way I get precision 45 joints is to use my tablesaw
    with a miter jig as talked about.
    But I could never get the accuracy unless I made it adjustable.
    Mines cheap and simple, but I have oversized holes on the back
    of the resting blocks so I can fine tune it.
    I cut two pieces, put them together and check with a good square
    for 90 degrees. I can adjust the jig to the thickness of a
    pencil line drawn on it. Just a .001" can make a difference.
    And to really make a good joint, install a sanding wheel in the
    saw and just kiss the stock to it with a jig.



    Jim C.

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