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Thread: Oak Threshold

  1. #1
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    Feb 2006
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    NY.
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    Oak Threshold

    I am trying to build a threshold out of soild oak. The dimensions of the piece are 30" long by 6" wide by 3/4" high. I am trying to fill a space where my tile floor ends. The Threshold will also be a step, as the door it will be under leads to my back hall.

    As the total height of my floor with tile is not 3/4", i need to somehow transition the height gap. I was thinking using a chamfer bit with my router but am not sure what angle bit to use, or if using a router is even the best way to accomplish this.

    Anyone have any suggestions? Has anyone else ever made something like this?



  2. #2
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    Sep 2004
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    Northern Colorado
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    RE: Oak Threshold

    A 45 degree chamfer is a stub/trip feature on a threshold plate. I prefer to run the piece on edge through the tablesaw with the blade canted 20 degrees or less to make that transition as shallow as possible. A hand plane can do a nice job at this too.
    Measure once... cut twice.

  3. #3
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    North Stamford, Connecticut, USA.
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    RE: Oak Threshold

    As it happens I just made one of these for a customer which was further complicated by the fact that the door was just over an inch clear of the floor at the opening side down to 5/8ths at the hinge side ..so I had a taper to deal with as well.
    I can't draw so If I can describe how I did this. The edges were routed with a 30* chamfer bit and a flat plateau left in the center.. total width of the threshold was circa 4".
    In the center I cut a groove to take an aluminum track that held the rubber domed cushion insert. Fixed the threshold to the floor by affixing with screws in the groove and once the aluminum track was fitted in the groove the whole effort was an invisible fix to the floor.

    Try and take some photos when I return to the States and though I say it myself it looked good ..the customer was well satisfied and it is /was not a trip hazard and there is no longer a blast of cold air coming through the entrance door.

    Few coats of wiped on linseed oil and it'll last forever...virtually.

  4. #4
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    Dec 1969
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    Bradford, Vermont, MerryCanna.
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    RE: Oak Threshold

    Yep, made some oak thresholds for this house.

    You're transitioning from, what - a 3/8" height on the tile to 3/4" height at the threshold? Yeah, in my experience that much chamfer (3/8") is fine at 45 degrees. Chamfer the other side of the threshold, too, to match.

    You can do it with either the table saw or the router.

    -- Tim --



    It's a bird!
    It's a plane!
    It's Supe...
    ...
    No, it's a bird.
    :)


  5. #5
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    Sep 2004
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    Huntington Beach, California, USA.
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    RE: Oak Threshold

    I just looked at the one I made 20 years ago. I did about a 20 degree bevel and I also had to rabbet out a space to clear the tile. I also started with a thicker slab of oak. (6/4 I think.)

  6. #6
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    Sep 2003
    Location
    mays landing, nj, usa.
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    13

    RE: Oak Threshold

    Set saw for 30, move fence so that the bevel will be about 3/16" from the bottom of the threshold. This leaves 3/16" square portion,the rest beveled. Sand,plane or whatever you have to clean up the sawcut.If you look at store bought thresholds,most are made this way.Cut grooves 1/8" deep,3/4" from each end and several more in the middle.Helps to prevent cupping, not a problem though if you install it within a couple of days.
    mike

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