Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    TX, USA.
    Posts
    2,105

    Poolewood lathe?

    My new officemate owns 3 lathes (actually owned by her late husband). She said that the Poolewood (England) is the biggest they made a few years back (maybe still is). The other 2 are General (Canada) which oddly is her late husband's favorite. One of the General was only used a few hours...and the first project he was working on is still mounted on it, unfinished. Been there the past 2 years she said.

    She hinted of selling the Poolewood...what would be the fair value for it IF it is well maintained and works like new?

    Dario :)
    [h4][font color = "blue"] Innovate or Stagnate[/font]
    [font color = "red"]"I count my blessings more than my misfortunes"[/font]
    [/h4]

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Bethlehem, Pa.
    Posts
    297

    RE: Poolewood lathe?

    Hey Dario,

    The person to ask would be Bill G. He has Big Blue. I think if I remember my figures right, new, Big Blue hovered around the 4k area, plus or minus a hundred.

    William

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    TX, USA.
    Posts
    2,105

    RE: Poolewood lathe?

    Thanks William...I just did :).

    I am not sure how lathe "depreciate" value wise over the years. Just preparing in case my officemate does sell it.

    Dario :)
    [h4][font color = "blue"] Innovate or Stagnate[/font]
    [font color = "red"]"I count my blessings more than my misfortunes"[/font]
    [/h4]

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Bethlehem, Pa.
    Posts
    297

    RE: Poolewood lathe?

    I think you will find that depending on the lathe, they will hold their value very well. Obviously it depends on condition, upkeep, etc. Certainly holds better value than what a car would! :)

    A good used lathe is hard to come by.

  5. #5
    Bill G
    Guest

    RE: Poolewood lathe?

    Hi Dario

    First you need to find out which model she has. The Euro 2000 (which is the one I have) is the most common one found here in the US. However, Poolewood made a monster Euro 3000 with a 3 HP 3 phase direct drive motor, and if I recall correctly, a 30" swing. I do not think they sold a lot of them though.

    My machine is complete with a metal stand and the outboard tool rest assembly. New it went for $5000. I have been using mine very hard for almost six years now, and there is no significant wear or tear beyond some paint damage. That includes hundreds of students doing their worst to it sometimes. I do have a little bit of trouble with dust in the rocker switches from time to time, and I had to replace the potentiometer that controls the speed, but that cost me all of $12.50 for an industrial grade one, plus about 30 minutes to solder it in. When the switches get to be too bad to live with, I blow them out real well with compressed air. My machine has a freestanding pedestal while newer versions of the machine had a different control pad with a magnetic base which would attach to anything with iron in it.

    The only quirky things with this lathe are the tool rest post, which is 30mm, and the solid headstock. There are a couple of places that make 30mm posts here in the US, and I would assume that Randy is one of them. The only things with the headstock are 1) don't forget to put the thread protector on before you install a taper, or you will be using vise grips and a hammer to get it out, and 2) there is only one source for a vacuum chuck if he does not already have one. }> Oh yeah, about 99% of the lathes that came into this country have a 1 1/4" x 8 tpi spindle, but a few came in with a 1 1/2" x 6 tpi BST. If it is that, and I really doubt it would be, then you have trouble. The BST stands for British Standard Thread, and has no match here in the US unless you can find a machinist to make it for you, and even then it is a royal pain in the rump roast to get the taps for it. You would be better off having the spindle turned down, which is what a friend of mine had done to his when it arrived that way.

    But anyway, I would not trade this lathe for any other, and with all due respect to those here on the board, I have turned on Stubby and Oneway lathes. I am now to the point in my turning career where I have been using it longer than any other machine I have owned, and I have owned 8 different lathes now. It is still my favorite, and I have turned on just about every lathe on the market, and some that aren't. I cannot speak for you or your preferences in a machine, but I think it would be a real deal if you can get your hands on it.

    Bill

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    TX, USA.
    Posts
    2,105

    RE: Poolewood lathe?

    Bill,

    Wow...great wealth of info there. THANKS!!!

    Now to my question...

    Say, if you don't have your lathe now and someone else is selling you the very same lathe you currently have (used), how much will you be willing to pay for it? Or what do you think is the fair ($$$) value now?

    Dario :)
    [h4][font color = "blue"] Innovate or Stagnate[/font]
    [font color = "red"]"I count my blessings more than my misfortunes"[/font]
    [/h4]

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Bethlehem, Pa.
    Posts
    297

    RE: Poolewood lathe?

    Dario,

    I defnitely agree with Bill G. If you can get your hands on the Big Blue, go for it. I had a wonderful opportunity to see it in action and it is a sweet machine. :)

    William

  8. #8
    Bill G
    Guest

    RE: Poolewood lathe?

    Hi Dario

    This is a toughie. On the one hand you have a top-o-the-line lathe that is relatively new, with little use. On the other you have a machine which is no longer in production, and parts availability is iffy. As far as most of those parts are concerned, they are things that can be replaced or built here in the states. Tool rests, faceplates, centers, etc, can all be had from a number of sources. Even bearings should not be a problem, other than the hassle of getting the headstock to a shop that can deal with them.

    Others, mainly the VFD, may need to be completely replaced if it goes belly up. Three phase motors are simpler and more durable than single phase motors, and unless you crack the ways by pounding on them or drop the tailstock, there is very little that can go wrong. The electronic package is the biggest if.

    Then there is the perspective of the buyer and seller. How bad do you want it? How bad does she want to get rid of it? How much does she need to make on it to stay solvent - i.e. what is your personal perspective on the treatment of widows? I had a friend who was a full time turner who died of cancer a while back. Another person claiming to be a good friend of his showed up and swindled his widow out of a dust collection system, paying $200 for something that was worth well over $1000. He got in and got out before any of the rest of us had a chance to help her out, and she trusted him. I am not implying that you would do anything of the sort, but there are widows who are looking at a hard life in front of them, and widows who are in better shape, at least financially. How you want to deal with her is entirely up to you, and of course your working together will have a bearing on that. It does you no good to get a great deal if she is going to feel swindled at some point and end up hating you every day in your face because of it. Please don't take this as my telling you how to act, I'm just musing "out loud" as it were on the whole pricing thing.

    To get down to hard numbers, I would say that the lathe would be worth a minimum of $3500, and probably closer to $4000. I know there are a lot of people out there who automatically say used equals half price, but that just ain't so in my book, either buying or selling. Of course that varies from machine to machine. I recently sold my unisaw for just about what a new one costs. Sure it had some extras to it, but it is also 50 years old. The guy that bought it is as happy as can be, and rightly so. We took it apart, drove it 20 miles, he reassembled it, and it is STILL cutting to about 0.001" of where it is set. On the other hand I just unloaded my Jet 14" bandsaw for $200, complete with Carter guides. It needs a motor and some other work, and the buyer knew that. I didn't make a lot of money off its sale, but we both got what we wanted. And, I will have a MM 20 in the shop in a week (insert stealth gloat here).

    But anyway, it is entirely up to you as to how to approach this lathe and its purchase. I will be glad to offer any advice you care to ask for, but remember that it is worth every penny you paid! ;) Good luck with it. Again, if you can lay hands on it for your own, you are going to have even more fun turning that you imagine.

    Bill

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    TX, USA.
    Posts
    2,105

    RE: Poolewood lathe?

    Thanks Bill. I think you covered all the bases there.

    My "new" officemate is actually been here far longer than I am (she used to be the HR manager) but recently transferred to IT. She is well informed of the worth of the tools, having shared her late husbands passion for woodworking.

    They actually built their own house (took 20 years to complete)...logged, hauled (400 miles each load, each way from her mom's ranch) and milled their own timbers (the 2 of them). They sold their top of the line woodmizer with auto-loader before he died.

    She is also not unloading just for the sake of money...she is financially secured. Since its been 2 years, she is also not doing it in a rush. Her husband was a premier member of the local woodturning club (no. 17 if I am not mistaken) so I am sure their friends have advised her of the lathe's worth already (if she did't know it to begin with).

    I am doing this research more for me ;)...don't want to be over paying...if I can afford it at all.

    Thanks a lot again Bill!!!

    Dario :)
    [h4][font color = "blue"] Innovate or Stagnate[/font]
    [font color = "red"]"I count my blessings more than my misfortunes"[/font]
    [/h4]

  10. #10
    Sonny Edmonds
    Guest

    RE: Poolewood lathe?

    Not to interupt here, but...
    usually when something "experianced" is purchased, it has some particular extras to consider added in as well.
    Like Bill pointed out his Unisaw had some extras with it, I would suspect there are some goodies that are particular to that Poolewood.
    Ask her price, pay her price, or graciously thank her and walk away from it.
    She's not out to put you over a barrel. So don't offend her, either.
    Honestly, 5000 new, plus shipping, maybe a chuck or two, maybe some extra face plates, she may have some boxes of extras for it.
    There could easily be well over 6000 invested (in old dollars).
    Don't be a tightwad about it's worth. ;)

    :D

    [link:www.sonnyedmonds.com | Sonny Edmonds]
    "Precision Firewood Specialist"
    God Bless America !
    One Nation Under God!
    "Lurkimus turdius orifus"





Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •