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  1. #1
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    Extend or relocate a Gas Pipe

    Hi all,

    I am trying to remodeling my kitchen cabinet.
    One thing I must deal with is relocating the
    gas pipe for the stove. I just need to extend
    it out about 10" and make it lower a little bit,
    perhaps 1-2" above the floor.

    My question is that, is it OK for me to do it
    myself or I need to ask the gas company to do it?
    When I bought my house, a worker from the gas
    company (PG&E) came over and he told me, any
    thing related to gas pipe has to be done by the
    gas company.

    If it's OK for me to do, any thing should I be
    ware of? I know that I need to use black pipe
    and I worked with some galvanized pipe before.

    Thanks a million for your input.

    Trucdan

  2. #2
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    RE: Extend or relocate a Gas Pipe

    Call the gas company.

    Tim

  3. #3
    Member
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    Dec 1969
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    New Smyrna Beach, Florida.
    Posts
    2,681

    Call the gas co.



  4. #4
    Member
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    Cloverdale, CA, USA.
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    653

    RE: Extend or relocate a Gas Pipe

    You can check with PG&E, but I tend to doubt they still do this kind of work. Likely you'll need a plumber or HVAC person---which may work if you have other plumbing work to deal with.

  5. #5
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    Seattle, Wa, USA.
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    682

    RE: Extend or relocate a Gas Pipe

    I just had to deal with this (still am actually). While the people that I talked to (plumber and PG&E included) said that I could do it myself, I ended up hiring a plumber, I didn't want a slow gas leak under the house :)

    Mat

  6. #6
    Grandad
    Guest

    RE: Extend or relocate a Gas Pipe

    There are two answers depending on how paranoid you are.

    If you will sit up at night wondering if you left a leak, no matter how good of a job you did, then you might want to hire a plumber.

    If you can follow some VERY simple instructions, do it yourself.

    UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES should you allow the idiots from the gas company to do this, especially if they are stupid enough to tell you they are the only ones that can. In Chicago the gas company frequently uses issues like this to shut off service to people just to be pricks. "But they had a little leak that might have caused a fire in 30 years."

    All you need to do is: Turn off the gas at the meter outside. You can then light the stove or something to drain off the gas, but it is NOT necessary. Disconnect the old pipe where needed. Add new pipe where needed. Make sure to include a union. Use only the expensive stainless steel flexible connectors above the valve you place near the stove. Cheaper ones tend to break after moving the appliance a few times. Even if you think the old one is good, it is worth replacing it. Use a good thread lock type sealant. Teflon pipe dope is good, but its purpose is to lubricate the threads, so you can tighten the fittings better. The thread on gas pipe is tapered, and the taper is what gives the seal, not the teflon or pipe dope. IF you use the thread lock kind, however, you don't even have to tighten the pipe to get a good seal (not that I recommened it). The only draw back is that stuff does not come off your hands, clothes, anything you get it on.

    When done, you can test it two ways. Liquid soap, like for dishes, or a match. Although people use matches all the time, I do not recommend that either. It really isn't an issue though, my brother has been doing it that way for decades. If something lights, you simply turn off the valve!

  7. #7
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    RE: Extend or relocate a Gas Pipe

    Thanks you all for your input.

    Granddad, what you've said make me very
    comfortable. I will try to do it the
    way you said. I think I can do it. I
    really hate to deal with the gas company.

    Thanks a lot.

    trucdan

  8. #8
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    Bradford, Vermont, MerryCanna.
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    RE: Extend or relocate a Gas Pipe

    Grandad's earning my respect by hops & jumps. No kidding, he's right in my ballpark on a lot of things.

    A couple of warnings, though. First, please DO light the stove to bleed off the residual pressure before you open the pipe. It's amazing just how much flame can come out of a little bit of gas at only 1 PSI.

    Second, be sure no open flames are anywhere near the pipe you're opening - if your stove has a pilot, let that pilot burn out completely (the ones for the burners AND the ones for the oven) before you open the pipe.

    Third, do NOT use the old-style pipe dope - if you use pipe dope at ALL, use the teflon dope. Better to use teflon tape. Reason? The old-style pipe dope contains an oxidizer that can react badly with gas.

    Fourth, do NOT use galvanized pipe with gas - ever. Use black ONLY. Reason? If, by any chance, you've left a little bitty leak that turns into a pilot flame that'd otherwise burn harmlessly until you found it, the heated galvanized pipe would generate highly toxic gases that you do NOT want in your winterized, draftproof house where you'll be breathing it.

    Stuff's easy to do, though. I prefer working with copper & flare fittings for gas where I can, but black pipe's not bad to work with at all. Gas is rather easy stuff. One of my first gainful-employment jobs when I was but an 18-year-old kid was to extend a gas line from one side of a trailer house to the other side. The guy gave me a very nice Washburn accoustic 6-string for it. Because it was my first gas chore, I even pressure-tested it for him. Installed a Shrader valve and proved that it'd hold 100 PSI indefinitely.

    -- Tim --

    E Lignus Unum

  9. #9
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    RE: Extend or relocate a Gas Pipe

    Hi TDHofstetter,

    Thanks for your wonderful tips.

    I read an online article about replace/relocate
    gas pipe. The author said that after you are
    done with the replacement, you need to turn
    the gas main valve on, and then come to the stove
    and and bleed some gas out (you will need to turn
    off the ignition). The reason is that when a new
    piece of pipe installed, there's some air trapped
    inside the pipe. Bleeding it out will get rid off
    the air.

    Do you think it's neccessary to do this step?

    Thanks.

    trucdan

  10. #10
    Member
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    Bradford, Vermont, MerryCanna.
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    RE: Extend or relocate a Gas Pipe

    Yep - the stove won't light until you bleed it out. It's not strictly necessary to kill the ignitor - it just won't have anything to ignite. If you have a pilot instead of an ignitor, it'll take some time before you can get the pilot to light.

    You don't need to bleed the air out through the FITTINGS unless you don't have any way to allow the gas on through the stove (as you'd have with a pilot "light" button). If you have an ignitor, you may simply have to get the stove to "try" on one or more burners (flame on FULL) for a little while until you can get ignition. Once you get a flame, it's bled.

    -- Tim --

    E Lignus Unum

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