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  1. #1
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    Gluing boards lengthwise

    I need to glue, or attach together someway, two boards length wise. What is the best way to do this to ensure a good, tight, longlasting bond??

  2. #2
    Member
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    RE: Gluing boards lengthwise

    [font size="1" color="#FF0000"]LAST EDITED ON Dec-09-00 AT 09:58AM (CDT)[/font][p]Edge joining is standard operation. First and foremost you need to have an absolutely straight and clean edge. Jointer will generally give cleanest edge, but properly adjusted TS will work as well. Use Elmers "Carpenters Yellow" or TiteBond-II for glue

    Take boards and lay 'em out. Keep flipping and rotating until you've got nice, straight joint pairs. Mark 'em so you can put them back the same way.

    To align panels biscuits are helpful. Center them in thickness and space every foot or less for smaller biscuits. Cut both using top surface as reference. You may need to lightly sand the edges to remove any tearout from the biscuiter.

    Glue up will require bar clamps, C clamps and some crossing boards at least as long as panel is wide. Get wet rag handy before you start to clean up glue squeeze out. Start with first board on edge. Spread glue evenly being sure to get some in biscuit slots. Insert biscuits. Glue 2nd board's mating edge. Assemble and wipe up glue squeeze out. Repeat as required.

    Lay crossing boards down on bench and lay panel down gently to prevent joints pulling apart (apply pressure to both edges as you lay it flat) Once flat use wood blocks to prevent marring and put limited pressure on with barclamps. Wipe up glue.

    Lay down 2nd set of crossing boards on top of panel directly above first set. Use C-clamps to clamp both crossing boards and panel into sandwich. These serve to hold panel flat. As you tighten C-clamps also snug down bar clamps *before* C-clamps are fully tightened (otherwise panels can't shift slightly to tighten up. Wipe up glue from both sides. Stand on edge and let set at least one hour or overnight.

    Remove clamps and plane/scrape/sand to remove any excess glue and level out any alignment imperfections.

    I have detailed photos of this process on my web page as part of the "Make a tile topped cherry table" project.

    http://www.netexperts.cc/~lambertm/Wood/wood.html

    M

  3. #3
    William
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    RE: Gluing boards lengthwise

    I read your question, perhaps incorrectly, that you want to join the boards end to end rather than edge to edge. If that is the case, you can use a half-lap joint, dovetails or finger joints. A special router bit can also be used. Each method will produce a stong joint. Of course ther are other ways that will work.

    If I totally misread what you meant then disregard this comment.

  4. #4
    Echris
    Guest

    RE: Gluing boards lengthwise

    Since you are asking the question I will assume you are new to woodworking. That probably means that you don't have a biscuit joiner.

    You don't really need to have the biscuit joiner to get the job done.

    If you don't have a biscuit joiner, follow Mad Marks instructions completely, without the bicuit joiner part, just know that you will have to do additional sanding or planing afterword. That assumes that you will not get a perfect allignment for the entire length of the glue joint.

    Another item I found to be helpful to prevent cupping of the boards was to alternate bar clamps one on top, the naxt underneath, and so on all the way down the board.

    Echris

  5. #5
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    RE: Gluing boards lengthwise

    I also read your question that you wanted to make a long board out of two shorter boards. The issue with this type of connection is that glues don't hold very well in end grain.
    That is the reason that you have to glue with long grain. The joints that William discussed are ways to get the glue on the long grain. There are shapper and router bits that will create finger joints to mak this kind of glue joint. If you have seen the paintable trim in the home stores you will see lots of evidence of this type of joint.
    I would not use this kind of connection to make a structural element in your project. Another method would be to rip the two boards into thiner strips and laminate them like you would in building a brick wall.

    If your question was how to make a wide board from narrow boards Mark gave a very good answer, I would add that it is very helpful to place plastic wrap or waxed paper between the boards and the clamps and blocking boards to prevent both discoloring and glueing your blocking boards to the panel

  6. #6
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    RE: Gluing boards lengthwise

    SORRY!! I should have explained what I was doing a little better. I have a biscuit joiner and have had good experience joining boards this way. However, I am making a pulpit for our church and it requires that I have two peices of oak 1 1/2 inches thick. I have purchase four boards 4' long X 3/4" thick and I need to hook them together to make two boards that are 4' long and 1 1/2 thick. Is glueing the best way to do this? I can't locate a local source for boards that are already thick enough.

  7. #7
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    RE: Gluing boards lengthwise

    You can very easily join the boards by face glueing them. You want to joint them first to get a good contact the total length without clamps. Then glue and clamp. The combined board will be as strong as and maybe stronger than a piece of wood 4 inch thick to start.



  8. #8
    carl
    Guest

    RE: Gluing boards lengthwise

    The easiest way to obtain the 1-1/2" x 1-1/2" blank you need for the pew rail is the face to face gluing method. With that amount of glue interface you don't need biscuits for alignment. I would rip the boards a little wider than 1-1/2", glue them together and then run them thru the planer to even the joints between the boards and then if needed you can run them thru the TS to trim to size.

    If you do not like the joint between the boards then you can essentially build a solid box by cutting 4 boards with the edges beveled 45 degrees and glue them together. All the joints would be in the corner and you have good clear grain on all the sides. This is more difficult and slower.

  9. #9
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    RE: Gluing boards lengthwise

    Bing Carl !

    I think he's trying to laminate the boards. Be sure to have the grain on each board in opposite directions. Depending on your taste/style you could very well counter sink a short lag bolt and cap with dowel plug. Using a plug cutter you can cut plugs from scrap stock, orientate the grain to a reasonable match and voila!

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