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  1. #1
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    Feb 2002
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    Holland, Iowa, USA.
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    Antique Chainsaw

    You folks seem to know about everything else, so I thought I'd try here since I found few if any appropriate forums on the net for a question like this:

    My father is working on a 7-55 McCulloch chain saw. It's a two man saw built in the early 60's. He's looking for carbuerator parts specifically.

    It's a two stroke, 7hp and weighs 55lbs this one comes with a 40" bar but you could get a bar up to 5' I believe. Ours is in excellent shape. Starts relatively easily for an engine that has set idle for at least 10 years. The saw runs off a 16:1 mixture of fuel to 30wt engine oil. Any information you have would be appreciated.

    Thanks,

    Steve Cox

  2. #2
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    Dec 1969
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    Bradford, Vermont, MerryCanna.
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    RE: Antique Chainsaw

    Darn, Steve. Carb parts for THAT might be hard to come by. What parts in specific? Flutter valves? Butterfly shaft? Needle valves? Gaskets?

    -- Tim --

    Everything you are is as old as time itself.
    That stuff of which you are made has been around forever,
    and will be around forever.
    You are only the current arrangement of that stuff.

  3. #3
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    Gaylord, Michigan.
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    RE: Antique Chainsaw

    Steve,

    Awhile back I picked up a 1947 5hp Johnson "Sea Horse" in fabulous shape. Any who, since I want to restore to mint condition the first place I went was to OMC's site. From there they linked me to a couple of sites that specialized in vintage Johnson and Evinrude outboard motors, snow balled from there. If I wanted to, I have enough sources to build one from scratch. Point is, you might want to check with McColloch first, I believe they are still around.

    If not, let me know. I know a few folks that could get you started in the right direction (I'm located in the heart of "timber country"). I'm curious though, if it's starting easy why rebuild the carb? My experience with vintage two strokes is that usually it's a matter of tweaking the lean/rich valve and needle valve. The other thing is that two stroke engines of that era were designed to run on a leaded gas/oil mix. With today's unleaded gas, it sometimes is just a matter of going to a cheaper gas (rabbet gas), changing brands, and/or fiddeling with the original mix ratio, normally going with a lower one. Doing so might also mean going with a cooler spark plug...FWIW.

    Dano


  4. #4
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    RE: Antique Chainsaw

    Great points. First, McCulloch went belly up about three years ago and I can't find any kind of website claiming them. Second, it does seem to start well. So why mess with it? My Dad has spent an entire career machining, building, and trouble-shooting engines for John Deere. He's now retired and running out of things to tinker with 'til now. Dad's quote about it was, "That's the strangest looking two cycle carb I've ever seen" so of course he's inclined to take it apart, but he's also smart enough not to start tinkering 'til he has a "good" source for parts.

    Since it does start and appears to run well we're gonna give her a wirl on a 32"dia burr oak dropped a couple weeks ago. Maybe if it performs up to "standard" (which I have no idea what standard would be)it'll be spared the wrench for now.

    He took the chain to a local sharpening shop and they asked him, "What's that off of? A trencher?" I'm a little leery of holding on to the "dummy" end of this unit this weekend. Always figured if I was gonna lose a digit, I do it on a table saw!

    Thanks guys,

    Steve Cox

  5. #5
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    Mar 2002
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    windber, pa, usa.
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    RE: Antique Chainsaw

    What kind of carb is it? You might be able to contact the manufacture of the carb, if still around. I am not sure but I think that McCulloch might be back in business, BUT from my understanding the availability for old parts is almost nonexistant through a dealer. I was told this by an X dealer that still did repair work within the past year.

    Mike

  6. #6
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    Sep 2004
    Location
    Tooele, Utah, USA.
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    RE: Antique Chainsaw

    Dan struck a good point in his post about leaded gas. Personally, I would head to one of the saw shops and buy some leading mixture for the gas you plan on using. I have seen it at Wal Mart even, but I am not sure that is a commonly stocked item, you might check in the auto department, though. Here, they stock it right by the grease clean-up solvent and gasoline stabilizers.



  7. #7
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    RE: Antique Chainsaw

    Does this ex-dealer have the micro-fiche with the "exploded" parts views? I'd love to get my hands on a copy if I could.

    Thanks,

    Steve Cox

  8. #8
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    windber, pa, usa.
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    RE: Antique Chainsaw

    To my knowlege no, I believe that he dumped everything when they went under. He mainly wants to only work on the new saws. I had a problem with a mac 10 that was about 20 yrs old and he couldn't get the part I needed (so he said).

    Mike

  9. #9
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    Holland, Iowa, USA.
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    RE: Antique Chainsaw

    Yeah, that's the most common story I've heard so far. My Dad has a 610B which has been our work horse for about 20yrs and we're scrambling to find the parts we "use" the most.

    This 7-55 monster is more of a toy for my Dad than a worker, at least I hope so. I found one guy with all the micro fiche except the one with the 7-55 on it.


    Steve Cox

  10. #10
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    Sep 2002
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    Oceanside, California, USA.
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    RE: Antique Chainsaw

    I needed a clutch for my McCullough a couple years ago, then found out they were gone. Did some searching on the web, and just about gave up. Was doing an unrelated search months later and came upon a small shop on the East Coast with parts (including my clutch for $9). I'll try to find the info, just don't give up, it's out there somewhere.


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