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  1. #1
    Joe Lyddon
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    Bondo... anyone use it to repair rotten wood?

    If so, can you give me some help as to:

    1. What kind to buy? (Where to buy it?) (How much is it?)
    2. How much to buy?
    3. How to mix it?
    4. How to apply it?
    5. Sand it?
    6. Prime it?
    7. Paint it?
    8. Like it?
    9. Don't like it because of .......

    Thank you! :)

    Have Fun!
    Joe

    http://woodworkstuff.net/

  2. #2
    Member
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    Jan 2006
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    Wi.
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    RE: Bondo... anyone use it to repair rotten wood?

    I used Bondo to patch up the skirting around a deck. After painting, you couldn't even tell. Alcohol was involved at the time, so it's not like there was any careful thought about this, but I've heard of other people doing this intentionally and having good results. I'm sure there's something made specifically for this, but Bondo worked okay for me.

    It's real easy to use. I used the two part stuff myself, we were actually working on a '75 Blazer, but I believe they make some pre-mixed stuff too. It's pretty cheap stuff, so I'd just buy a bit more than I thought I'd need.

  3. #3
    Member
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    Mar 2003
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    Sugar Hill, Georgia.
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    1,471

    RE: Bondo... anyone use it to repair rotten wood?

    1. What kind to buy? (Where to buy it?) (How much is it?)
    I used Bondo brand packaged as a wood filler. I'm pretty sure it's the same stuff they sell in the car parts stores as auto body filler. I think I bought it at Lowes. I don't remember how much it was, but it seems like less than $10.

    2. How much to buy?
    That was easy. They only had one size. It's a volume deal. It'll fill about as big a hole as the size of the can. It doesn't expand or shrink.

    3. How to mix it?
    I mixed mine on a paper plate with a popsicle stick as a stirrer.

    4. How to apply it?
    It depends on how big the hole you're filling is. I used a small putty knife to apply mine.

    5. Sand it?
    Just like wood.

    6. Prime it?
    Just like wood.

    7. Paint it?
    Just like wood.

    8. Like it?
    It serves the purpose, I guess. It depends on what you're doing and why you're doing it. I had some rot in a door frame. I dug out the rot, sprayed in some nasty chemical (a home brewed bora-care, as I recall), and filled it with bondo. It was a stop gap measure. Had I the time I'd have done something more appropriate.

    9. Don't like it because of .......
    It ain't wood.


  4. #4
    Member
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    North Stamford, Connecticut, USA.
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    RE: Bondo... anyone use it to repair rotten wood?

    Joe, I work as a Home Handyman Technician so come across this problem quite frequently.
    Two products I use regularly are Min Wax Hardener which is a liquid you paint on and reinforces the surface ready for the filler...good thing is it works even if the wood is not totally dry.

    They also make a grey bondo type paste which you squeeze a dab of hardener with and it works and smells exactly the same as genuine Bondo but it's more expensive...you can guess which one I use. Depending on weather ,temperature I will add more or less hardener as in cold conditions it takes considerably longer to harden to the point that it can be planed or sanded smooth..most customers won't pay for two visits??

    However in the summer it hardens very quickly and so mixing large amounts is a prob as you have to work like the clappers to get it in place and fashioned before it gets too hard.

    It's an exothermic reaction so it sets up and hardens evenly ..i.e. it doesn't slump too much and doesn't skin.

    The other stuff I use and love can be found here but it is pricey

    http://www.rotdoctor.com/epoxy/woodrestoration.html

    Just dig out the rot and then use the hardener ..this way the patch stays in situ and dooesn't shrink and fall out.

    Theres also another product I use indoors whose name escapes me but it sticks like the proverbial to a blanket, is base cream color rather than off white or grey and is easily tinted with powder pigments for perfect matching while you work it and hardens at the same color so you can (with a good eye)make truly invisible repairs.
    I'll try and find the exact name if you need it but its something like Abutron.

  5. #5
    Member
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    Dec 2005
    Location
    Richmond, Kentucky.
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    111

    RE: Bondo... anyone use it to repair rotten wood?

    I've heard that you can use superglue on rotten wood as it soaks in and actually makes the rotten stuff solid again. I've never done it tho and don't know how it would take paint and stuff.

    Ian

  6. #6
    Member
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    Dec 1969
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    Bradford, Vermont, MerryCanna.
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    RE: Bondo... anyone use it to repair rotten wood?

    I've been plenty happy with ordinary Bondo autobody filler from the local auto parts store. Practically every car-parts place carries it, as to KMart and Wal-Mart (usually). Not the stuff with embedded fiberglass fibers - that's rough on tooling. No need for it anyway. Also not the Bondo brand fiberglass (polyester, really) resin that comes in the "hip flask" can - just Bondo in the big round can. Pint, quart, gallon.

    Don't buy a whole lot more than you really need, 'cause the little bottle of hardener will crack & leak & be a general mess if it waits around a long time.

    Mix according to directions on the can, approximately. It's not overly critical. Mix on some surface you do NOT care about - like the bottom of a broken plastic bucket, a paper plate, in somebody else's shoes. Mix with nearly anything - popsicle stick, tongue depressor, somebody else's shoehorn.

    If ya get a little on ya, don't fret it. It'll pop back off after it's hardened. Do NOT get it in your hair or your socks.

    Pretty much smear it on & in. Apply far too much. Work FAST 'cause ya ain't got much time after it's mixed right.

    Use a rasp or a Surform plane to shape it pretty nearly the way you want it. An angle grinder does a good fast rough job, too. When it's nearly how you want it, break out the sandpaper. It'll take about the finest sandpaper you're willing to throw at it.

    Yup. Ordinary primer works well. Paint per taste. I kinda' like the flavor of enamel, myself, but that may be an acquired taste.

    :)

    -- Tim --



    Call me
    Kaw-liga
    :)


  7. #7
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    Sundance, Wyoming, USA.
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    RE: Bondo... anyone use it to repair rotten wood?

    Bondo, or plastic filler by any other brand is not water proof. As a mater of fact it will take water. It's fine to use indoors on wood, but I would go with Duraglass made by Evercoat, on anything outside. It's water proof and mixes and spreads just like "bondo" but it's water proof. It is harder to sand than bondo though so don't over build to much.

    I get mine from a local Napa, but I would think you could do a google if your local place doesn't carry it. I think it comes in quarts, I buy gallons, body shop and all.

    ~Mike



  8. #8
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    Mar 2002
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    Tucson, AriDzona.
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    RE: Bondo... anyone use it to repair rotten wood?

    You can get clear hardener for regular bondo ya know, makes it grey instead of red ;)

  9. #9
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    Tucson, AriDzona.
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    RE: Bondo... anyone use it to repair rotten wood?

    Sure, but if you prime and paint it's a non-issue IMO. Just like when it's skim coated on cars.

  10. #10
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    RE: Bondo... anyone use it to repair rotten wood?

    It's not a non issue, even on cars. Haven't you ever ground off bondo and found rust? If you use to much hardner the heat created can cause condesation, hence rust. Then there are those guys that drill holes threw the metal panel for pulls and just throw bondo over the top, those little bondo boogers draw water. I quit using anything but duraglass in the bodyshop years ago. More expensive to be sure but worth it I think.

    I believe on wood it would take moisture, hold it and cause rot over time.

    I may not be a master woodworker but when it comes to body work I am a Master.
    http://www.customers.collinscom.net/...y/aselogo2.jpg

    ~Mike

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