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  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Charlotte, NC, USA.
    Posts
    30

    How do you apply a router fence without using a router table

    Hello again,
    I have a question about Routing an edge.

    My current project: Office Desk
    Question about the following step:
    http://popularmechanics.com/home_imp...k/index5.phtml

    Background:
    I've purchased a 3/4" X 4" x 80" piece of poplar.
    I plan to rip the poplar with my TS to get teh 3/4 X 3/4 piece of poplar and have enought left over to to the edging for the entire desktop.

    My Question:
    The step says first glue the edges to the desktop and clamp them in place, then route the edge with a roundover bit.
    1) Couldn't I route the edging first then clue it, or would that cause problems trying to clamp it?

    It also says that when you route the top portion of the edging the ball bearing of the router bit will act as a fence, but for the underside of the edging you will need to use a router fence.
    2) How would you apply this router fence, so you do not unevenly route the underside of the edging?

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Concord, NC, USA.
    Posts
    1,841

    RE: How do you apply a router fence without using a router t


    >The step says first glue the edges to the desktop and clamp
    >them in place, then route the edge with a roundover bit.
    >1) Couldn't I route the edging first then clue it, or would
    >that cause problems trying to clamp it?
    You get a much better edge routing it afte it's installed. Plus you don't have to worry about mitering the corners of a router profile. another thing is you have a larger piece to set the router on to keep it stable.
    >
    >It also says that when you route the top portion of the
    >edging the ball bearing of the router bit will act as a
    >fence, but for the underside of the edging you will need to
    >use a router fence.
    >2) How would you apply this router fence, so you do not
    >unevenly route the underside of the edging?
    In this case, a router fence is nothing more than a straight piece of wood clamped to the piece just far enough in from the edge so the bearing touches the wood but the fence actually limits the router. Rounding over the second half of an dge usually leaves little or not flat surface for the bearing to run on so you get a "step" in the routed edge. Using the clamp-on fence fixes that.


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