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  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1

    Trying to learn new things

    I have been in the woodworking business for over 3 years. Young and determined I try to learn new things everyday as a hobby in the small (16x10) shop I have. Limited tools but in the process of getting tools but have access to a lot. My latest adventure are 3 stumps of oak about 3ft tall and size ranges in width. Looking to make a rustic looking stool with them and would like to preserve the wood with the best stuff I can get. Being in a small town I am limited to Lowes and the local lumber company. Any ideas or tips would be helpful.

    Thanks to all for reading,
    Ryan J

  2. #2
    Great aspirations and attitude. Living in a small town may be a major asset when you work with wood. Fewer things distract you from your shop. Good luck with everything.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Bahamas
    Posts
    5
    Lowes should have something that will give you the results you want,those guys are pretty knowlegable and product savvy.Good luck.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Bahamas
    Posts
    5
    Ryan,When you first started woodworking what woods did you find it easiest to work with,can you explain why if you did find that some woods were better to work with as a beginner than others.

    Thanks.

  5. #5
    Keep honing your skills. Your attitude is the best tool you have. Best of luck with everything.

  6. #6
    We just have to make the best out of what we have.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    20
    One of the most obtainable preservative for your projects would be deck water sealant to keep out moisture. Also, If you have the resources, I also suggest a mixture of Linseed oil and turpentine.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    20
    Me again. Linseed oil is also known as flax oil, and can be found at any woodworking store. I forgot to mention earlier that the oil should be mixed with only a small amount of turpentine. For this and other rustic advice, you can read this article by Daniel Mack:

    http://www.motherearthnews.com/diy/t...#axzz30rZfeKU6

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Frankfort, KY
    Posts
    126
    I like linseed oil as an exterior finish & have used it a lot over the years. Use boiled linseed oil. Mix it with turpentine depending on how thick you want it. Thinner will dry faster. Japan Drier is added to speed drying times a little & harden it, but it will always be a soft finish. It scratches easily, but those can be rubbed out easily. I put a coat of 50/50 mix with a dash of JD on shovel & other tool handles every few years. It keeps them from splintering & yet isn't slippery when my hands are sweaty like polyurethane would be. I put the same on some outdoor chairs & benches I made out of oak fence boards every other year.

    I spent most of one winter putting a hand rubbed linseed oil finish on a rocking chair for the front porch. It's held up pretty well, but is always a bit tacky especially when it is hot & humid. My mother has a similar finish on her kitchen table & it's been the same since I can recall, so over 50 years. The really cool thing about it is that it has always been about the same. My stool that was purchased at the same time was used outside to hold plants for several years & looked awful. A bit of washing, another coat of linseed oil, & it looks like it did over 50 years ago.

    As for preserving your 'stumps of oak', I have no clue. What kind of oak; red, white, or live? Are they stumps or logs? If the latter, are you going to rive them into boards & then build a stool? Or are you just leaving them whole?

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    20
    JimMack, I would like to see some pictures of those fence board chairs and benches. I thought about making a settee (spelled right?) out of fence pickets and reclaimed wood a while ago, but never put it into action. Also, thanks for your linseed oil insights. You have persuaded me to use it more often!

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