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  1. #1
    Scott (Guest)
    Guest

    What is the best glue for furniture making?

    I'm getting ready to make a mission style dining room table, and I was wondering if some of you experts might tell me where I can find the best glue to use for bicuit joining etc??? Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    Member
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    Dec 1969
    Location
    Bradford, Vermont, MerryCanna.
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    18,751

    RE: What is the best glue for furniture making?

    Ain't gonna be an EXPERT answer, but...

    If your joints are tight, yellow PVA glue works great.

    If you need more assembly time, white glue works great.

    If your joints aren't perfectly tight and you need something that'll bridge gaps, polyurethane glue works great.

    Hide glue works great if you're ready to work fast and you don't mind that it dries out & crystallizes with advanced age.

    If you're doing high-stress bending or you need perfectly waterproof glue, two-part epoxy works great.

    I don't personally like urea-formaldehyde glue.

    For most jobs - yellow glue is my adhesive of choice.

    -- Tim --

    Forever endeavor.

  3. #3
    AlMiles (Guest)
    Guest

    RE: What is the best glue for furniture making?

    The best glue? you are asking for tons of responses from people full of opinions ;)

    I've had a lot of luck and heard other people have as well with Gorilla Glue. Go to the woodlinks section at this site, click on the glue section and look through that.

    One small warning.... do not use gorilla glue at 11:00 at night. I did. It's the consistency of honey and has no known solvent. I didn't realize I had a little on my face until I woke-up the next morning. :)

  4. #4
    Member
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    Dec 1969
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    San Jose, CA.
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    4,530

    RE: What is the best glue for furniture making?

    All of todays glues are stronger than the wood itself when properly applied and cured. For your use stated Yellow wood glue would be the choice I would make. It it is going to take you a while to get the pieces glued together and clamped the elmers white glue allows for more fuss time than the yellow pva glue.

    The only time you need to do anything else is if you have a waterproff application Gorella glue. Or you are restoring an old piece and then I would go hide glue.

    Lou

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    monaca, pa, usa.
    Posts
    107

    RE: What is the best glue for furniture making?

    I use yellow carpenters glue (tite bond) for everything ecxept box and dovetail joints i use gorilla , good lucck and dont try to clamp so hard the glues squeezes out it makes the joint less strong, and i always leave the loints clamped up for about 1 hour and ake them off then ill leave it alone for a bout 24 .
    Jeff

  6. #6
    Scott (Guest)
    Guest

    RE: What is the best glue for furniture making?

    Thanks for the help guys. This is a really cool site to hear how others have handled your situation. I appreciate the help!

  7. #7
    Member
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    Sep 2004
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    North Stamford, Connecticut, USA.
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    4,890

    RE: What is the best glue for furniture making?

    Good advice Jeff
    The major cause of glue failure usually stems from the natural instinct to clamp the living daylights out of it and leave it in the clamps overnight. Both, as jeff states, weaken rather than strengthen the joint.
    Cheers Limey

  8. #8
    Member
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    Dec 1969
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    RE: What is the best glue for furniture making?

    I have always been told not to over-tighten but I never knew that leaving it clamped over-night is bad... Good to know. Most of the time it is just between like 10pm and 7 am.


    Mental note.



    Chris.


  9. #9
    Member
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    Sep 2004
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    North Stamford, Connecticut, USA.
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    RE: What is the best glue for furniture making?

    Yes Chris,
    Without giving you a long and boring dissertation on the principles of adhesion(mechanical vs.specific).
    Basically once the glue has given up some of its water by absorption It still has enough flexibility to hold the tension that any stress in the wood is still imposing and cure appropriately.

    God my brain's fried and I can't explain it clearly.
    If all else fails, as they say, read the instructions. I think you'll find that on most containers they give you a recommended clamping time.
    I know my Titebond bottle does.
    Cheers one shagged out Limey
    (goodnight)

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