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  1. #1
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    Glue for cold weather

    What the best glue to use for temperature below 40F?

  2. #2
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    RE: Glue for cold weather

    Ice. :) :) :)

    Dang - a good glue for COLD temperatures. It ain't yellow glue; that turns gawky white with the cold & gets weak. Ain't polyurethane glue, either - not if the temp drops below freezing so it won't set up (it won't catalyze without liquid water). Not even epoxy - that gets thick like mortar while you mix it (although I've DONE it at subfreezing temperatures - it's just a lot more work). Construction adhesive turns into tootsie rolls at temperatures like that. Liquid hide glue is iffy 'cause of the water content, and "real" hide glue needs to stay hot till it sets up; too chilly too fast & you lose your bond. Urea-formaldehyde (if you could get it off the shelf) might be a good bet... but the availability is awful.

    My bet is for the epoxy; that's about the only thing I'd trust in really cold (HA! COLD? That aint' COLD - I'll SHOW you cold!) temperatures... especially if it drops below freezing.

    -- Tim --

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  3. #3
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    RE: Glue for cold weather

    Why? Are you still in Milwaukee? ;)

    Craig in 20-degree Indy

  4. #4
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    RE: Glue for cold weather

    Actually any glue is good at temperatures below 40. You just have to work in a well heated shop. ;)

    (Ya saw that one coming didn't ya?)



  5. #5
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    RE: Glue for cold weather

    I just thought to add one more thought. It's about epoxy. It takes a LONG TIME TO SET UP in the cold. I've had five-minute epoxy take two DAYS to set up hard in that sort of temperature... that was last winter, fixing a headboard for a neighbor. You can get any epoxy to fully cure REALLY FAST at 250 degrees in an oven... but get it cold & you have a very, very long time to wait for it to be full hard. Oh, it STARTS about as fast as normal... you can't extend your "pot time" by chilling it... but it just takes forever to FINISH.

    -- Tim --

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  6. #6
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    RE: Glue for cold weather

    "that was last winter, fixing a headboard for a neighbor"

    Did you break the neighbor lady's headboard? ;)

  7. #7
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    Arkville, NY, USA.
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    RE: Glue for cold weather

    good question - i wish i knew the answer. last weekend, i heated up a small portion of my shop with an electric heater so i could glue a cabinet together.. it worked once i got the room warm. However -- the shock of the temp and humidity change make the veneer on the plywood crack... Thankfully, mos tof it was hidden and is not high-end veneer plywood... elsewise, i would have been t'd off...

    I wish we could get Titebond and/or Gorilla to explore a cold weather glue... b/c then we only have to paint/stain/poly our projects inside and not have to worry about gluing...

    and we use an oil/wax finish, it would ALL be possible outside... considering one cannot really glue outside from October thru April (b/c the nights get cold too) up here - it is very limiting...

    later, John

  8. #8
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    RE: Glue for cold weather

    Heat the resins before mixing, then keep heat on the joint until it hardens. Heating the faces of the joint prior to mixing and assembly helps all the more. A hair dryer works nicely on a small area. For larger areas try a heat lamp. Just don't get it too close to the surface and burn something.

    art

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